Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble - Couldn't Stand the Weather

  • Mastered from the Original Master Tapes with Mobile Fidelity's One-Step Process: The Ultimate Version of Stevie Ray Vaughan's sophomore album

  • Deluxe Audiophile Pressing Strictly Limited to 7,000 Numbered Copies

SOPHOMORE ALBUM BROILS WITH AUTHORITY AND INTENSITY AND HAS NEVER SOUNDED BETTER
Like the destructive tornado on the album's cover, Stevie Ray Vaughan's Couldn't Stand the Weather blows with gale-force intensity, moves everything in its path, and contains beautiful moments of calm at its center. Caught up in the momentum gained from his brilliant debut, the guitar slinger comes on with a startling degree of authority, confidence, and swagger that hadn't been witnessed in the blues realm in decades.

Scuttle Buttin'
Couldn't Stand the Weather
The Things (That) I Used to Do
Voodoo Chile (Slight Return)
Cold Shot
Tin Pan Alley
Honey Bee
Stang's Swang
At last, this incredible tour de force has been finally been done right. Surpassing the myriad inferior remastered and reconfigured editions, we went straight to the source – the original master tapes – to produce a version of Couldn't Stand the Weather into your listening room and places them at your feet. Vaughan's trademark Fender Stratocaster has never sounded more lifelike, powerful, or authentic.

By the time Vaughan and Double Trouble entered the studio in January 1984, the band's reputation as the hottest blues-rock act in the world had been cemented. Vaughan even declined a juicy offer to tour as part of David Bowie's band in order to live out his own dreams. And this proud Texas boy doesn't mess around. Pulling no punches and embracing his role as blues' modern ambassador, Vaughan's scorching 1984 record epitomizes his hallmark styles and moods: brazen, ferocious, mesmerizing, cathartic, defiant, soulful, all at once.

Here, in the form of the jaw-dropping version of "Voodoo Chile (Slight Return)," is Vaughan's touching acknowledgment of Jimi Hendrix's looming influence. And in the hopping instrumental "Scuttle Buttin'," there's a lingering taste of the guitarist's playful personality and pyrotechnic skill. "Cold Shot" bleeds with a lover's scorn, but like a determined fighter, Vaughan picks himself up off the canvas and rears, ready to make another go. Brother Jimmie Vaughan assists on the title track, redolent with the slinky rhythms gleaned from rural Texas bluesman and down-home attitudes.

As he did on Texas Flood, Vaughan closes out the record in high style, bringing the concoction of smoldering blues, sultry shuffles, and jukejoint boogies to a simmer with the instrumental "Stang's Swang" – dedicated to jazz great Grant Green and punctuated with Stan Harrison's fiery tenor saxophone lines. Gutsy, gritty, and ceaselessly original, Couldn't Stand the Weather served further notice that Vaughan was here to stay and demanded to be heard. The double platinum sales figures and Grammy nominations were additional confirmation of that fact.

(LMFUD1S007)

SKU LMFUD1S007
Barcode # 0821797200523
Brand Blues